Influence of Drones

Drones are delivering the ability to transform wildlife conservation, illegal fishing patrols and detect illegal poachers from the air. Now these unmanned aerial vehicles look set to be a big boon in efforts to preserve, monitor, and restore rainforests around the world. Drones will be a game changer for tropical forest recovery and conservation, as many rainforest regions are difficult to access and many land owners are individual farmers who possess neither the time, the skill or the money. Read More

THE VALUE OF DRONES IN CONSTRUCTION

Drones are already proving incredibly efficient at aerial mapping on building sites, and they are forming an integral part of business operations for innovative construction firms the world over. A drone has a unique set of attributes that sets it apart from conventional construction machinery, unlike cranes, drones have the ability to reach any point in space. Drones can be a major contribution on the projects where labor is prohibitively expensive, or workers cannot go there.

Floating Hotel

The Floating Hotel is developed by Salt & Water (Architecture and Yacht design company) with the aim to promote tourism on inland waters that offer wonderful examples of untouched (and often neglected) nature.  Here, the floating hotel would be a perfect solution for tourism without any violation of the natural harmony of the place itself.

The main idea is to allow users to enjoy their visit through navigating the waterways at a very slow speed and with an uninterrupted view of nature . For this reason the catamarans have this unusual shape with large windows in the front.

Source: http://saltandwater.rs/floating-hotel-with...

Multi-species 3-D ocean farms

In recent years, scientists and entrepreneurs have been working on ways to create a more sustainable food system. GreenWave, on Long Island, has accomplished that by setting up "multi-species 3-D ocean farms" growing seaweed, scallops, mussels, clams, and oysters. 

The vertical seaweed gardens are designed to provide an alternative for communities that can no longer rely on fishing.  Seaweed farms have the capacity to grow huge amounts of nutrient-rich food, and oysters can act as an efficient carbon and nitrogen sink.

GreenWave is a winner of the prestigious Buckminster Fuller Institute prize for the project “world’s first multi-species 3-D ocean farm,” a vertical underwater garden that aims “to restore ocean ecosystems and create jobs in coastal communities by transforming fishers into restorative ocean farmers. The sustainable underwater farms may offer a new source of income for fishermen who can no longer rely on fishing. Read More>

A drawing of Greenwave’s 3D Ocean Farming system / Greenwave

A drawing of Greenwave’s 3D Ocean Farming system / Greenwave

Instead of monolithic factory fish farms, GreenWave see the oceans as the home of small-scale farms where complementary species are cultivated to provide food and fuel -- and to clean up the environment and fight climate change. Smith believes seaweed is a viable alternative because it is healthy and sustainable. Instead of harming the ocean, seaweed farms actually help to pull pollution out of the water. In short, seaweed gardens can actually remove carbon dioxide and nitrogen from the ocean.

Governed by an ethic of sustainability, they are re-imagining our oceans with the hope of saving us from the grip of the ever-escalating climate, energy, and food crises.

Trophic cascades are powerful indirect interactions that can control entire ecosystems.

In the early 1900s, when wolves roamed Yellowstone, young trees such as aspen and willow were abundant. In 30 years, after wolves were hunted out, the forest stopped regenerating. Reintroducing wolves into Yellowstone National Park after nearly 70 years of absence has been controversial. However, the effects have been utterly transformative to the Yellowstone ecosystem.

A trophic cascade recently has been reported among wolves, elk, and aspen on the northern winter range of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA.

What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?  What happens when a species that has been hunted to extinction is introduced to its happy hunting grounds after 70 years? Find out in this beautiful little film.

Could the impact of a species on an entire ecosystem  leads us to think differently about sustainable lines for solving the global climate crisis?